The Blood is the Life for 24-06-2017

Jun. 24th, 2017 11:00 am
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[personal profile] miss_s_b

Well it's not Watergate....

Jun. 24th, 2017 08:30 am
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[personal profile] legionseagle
...except in the sense of the cover-up being worse than the original offence, but the strange goings on at Holman Fenwick and Willan's Christmas Quiz have livened up what was otherwise a rather dull crop of stories over at Roll on Friday.

(The most interesting thing which happened recently in the legal world prior to Quizgate was the merger between Bond Dickinson, a firm memorable for one associate complaining that "I have more chance of being savaged to death in the gents loos by a walrus than I have of making partner at Bond Dickinson" during a RoF Quality of Legal Life survey, and Womble Carlyle , a US firm, creating a "transatlantic giant" to be called Womble Dickinson which, as per a lawyer I bumped into at a recent course on digital rights confirmed, is as a result in the middle of a mass exodus of talent, since it's bad enough being expected to work US legal hours on a UK legal salary, but having all your peers at other firms singing, "Remember you're a womble" at you on every conceivable opportunity puts the cherry on top of the shit sundae.)

Anyway, Holman Fenwick are a traditional shipping firm, and those always have a bit of a reputation for excessive machismo, especially the "wet" shipping specialists, and as per people chipping in in comments, the partner in question has the reputation of being the biggest wanker in a tough field. When his team won the Christmas quiz by a large margin, it was whispered in the ears of HR that there might have been dirty work at the crossroads, and, indeed, it transpired that the quiz question and answer document had been opened on said partner's computer hours before the quiz commenced.*

Where things then took a turn for the worse is that the partner alleged that it wasn't him, squire, his computer must have been hacked. And while cheating on the Christmas quiz barely registers on the list of batty things I've heard of partners in law firms doing in my thirty-odd years in this profession (in no particular order, these include but are not limited to: ordering one's trainee to iron one's jodhpurs in time for hunting at the weekend, throwing a Company seal at the head of a trainee, ordering a trainee to mouth-siphon petrol out of another car in the office carpark during a fuel shortage, resulting in hospitalisation of said trainee, asking a dark-skinned and a light-skinned secretary at a Christmas party, "Well, girls, how do you feel about cafe-au-lait?", inviting two interviewees to a brothel as soon as the interview had finished with the words, "Well, now that's over, let's go and get our nobs polished" ....) allegations of hacking into partnerial computers** get the IT team really interested, officially because it threatens the integrity of client communications, but really I suspect because it gives them a chance to give the thing a right going over in the hope of being able to go "Good God, I'm glad you brought us in. The same person who framed you for the Christmas quiz must have also tried to frame you for the possession of porn! Look, this file here --and here -- and here -- there's terrabytes of the stuff! We'll have to extend the search to all your mobile devices too, I'm afraid."

Anyway, I'm going with "watch this space."



*HFM clearly take a Kingscote-like approach to security of examination questions and the like. It would never have happened in the Airedale Quiz league, in which I played for about five years.

** Which is usually like taking candy from a baby, tbf; I once many years ago took advantage of the habit one of our partners had of leaving his computer logged on and unlocked while he went off on hours-long gossip sessions with the other team partners to send round an email warning the department of the dangers of leaving one's computer logged on and unattended, and then departed on holiday before the fallout happened.

hey linux networking peeps

Jun. 23rd, 2017 10:32 pm
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[personal profile] solarbird

I’m finally getting back to working on a new gateway/router server and I’m basically setting up this old-school sort of DMZ, with the rest of our servers hanging off one card, and our internal LAN/DHCP/NAT side hanging off the other. (Using ISC, which Debian seems to like.) And all of that seems to be right from the new server’s perspective, which is yay!

Except there’s no packet forwarding from the DHCP side even though it’s enabled and I’m sure I enabled it and yes the kernel thinks its enabled but it isn’t happening.

Any ideas where to start?

Mirrored from Crime and the Blog of Evil. Come check out our music at:
Bandcamp (full album streaming) | Videos | iTunes | Amazon | CD Baby

kshandra: pixie with purple wings aloft before a full moon (Good)
[personal profile] kshandra
Somewhat ironic, considering the name of the album it's from...

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[personal profile] dialecticdreamer
Detours and Obstacles
by Dialecticdreamer/Sarah Williams
part 3 of 3
word count (story only): 1683


:: This story follows immediately on the heels of Speed Bump!” and continues the theme of unexpected events and unexpected reactions. I do apologize; I usually plan better than this! Enjoy the last part of the story! ::


back to part two
:: Thanks for reading! ::




“We're going to Its Your Body Shop,” G began, shrugging diffidently, as only a teen could.

“In Humboldt?” the young woman blurted. Her fingers clenched, revealing large, white knuckles beneath her golden skin. “Like, really?”

“Yeah,” G brightened. “It would make the whole thing more fun if I knew somebody wading through things at the same time. I mean, my friends are great, but the only person who came close to understanding was almost literally run out of town by her family's reaction.” The teen pointed out the tinted side window on the van. “Dad, the tow truck's almost here.”

“Already?” Joshua frowned, then smoothed it away. He wasn't trying to overly influence the young woman, and she had every right to back out because of the emotional upset of the day.
Read more... )
[syndicated profile] alpennia_feed

Posted by Heather Rose Jones

Friday, June 23, 2017 - 21:25

It's been a lot of fun doing a themed set of blogs and podcasts this month focusing on Sappho. The new episode is out, talking about the transmissiong of Sappho's body of work down the centuries, with examples of translations and works inspired by her poetry. I'm looking for other topics where I can coordinate publications and podcasts. And look for some changes coming to the LHMPodcast in August, with an expanded schedule and new types of content. Just as a hint: one of the new features will be interviews with authors of historically-based fiction featuring queer female characters. If there's an author you'd like to see us feature, let me know. (I can't promise anything specific, since I'm looking to create a balance of topics and representations, but I'm definitely looking for ideas.)

 

Major category: 
[syndicated profile] crosscutnews_feed

Posted by David Kroman

Taser survey

The Seattle Police Department Friday released a trove of new information about the death of Charleena Lyles, the 30-year-old African American woman shot and killed by officers Jason Anderson and Steve McNew last Sunday.

In transcripts of interviews conducted during an internal department investigation, Officer Anderson says he received training to carry a Taser, but was not carrying the stun gun at the time of the shooting.

This is a problem: According to SPD’s policy manual, all officers trained to carry Tasers are required to carry it on every shift.

Anderson, who was hired by the department in 2015, gives his interviewers several reasons why he did not have his Taser. At one point, he tells them he decided several months ago to no longer carry it. When asked why, he explains that he’s a “slender guy. I don’t have a lot of room for equipment on my belt and the Taser is, takes up, uh, quite a bit of r-real estate on, you know, my vest and my belt.”

When asked again about the Taser, Anderson offers a second explanation: His battery died, so he simply left it in his locker. When asked whether he inquired about getting a new battery, Anderson says no.

“I’m sorry, did you say you had not contacted anyone yet?” responds Officer George Davisson, one of the investigators questioning Anderson.

“I had not,” answers Anderson.

“And that was just regards to getting a battery replacement,” says Davisson. “Have you communicated to anybody that you were contemplating not carrying a Taser anymore?”

“Um, I had, I had, I believe I had um explained to my squad-mates that I currently wasn’t carrying a Taser and um I had informed them at some point um that I wasn’t carrying a Taser,” Anderson says.

Anderson then explains to the interviewers that he does not think a Taser would have been appropriate, given the circumstances.

Lyles called police Sunday morning to report a burglary, apparently of an Xbox. Audio released by the department reveals that officers knew that Lyles had been struggling with mental illness. As a result, the department dispatched two officers to the scene, rather than just one. McNew had received a full 40-hour Crisis Intervention Training course.

When they approached Lyle’s apartment, the interaction was at first cordial. But according to the department, Lyles pulled a knife and both officers fired. Three of Lyles’ children were in the apartment. According to her family, Lyles had recently learned she was pregnant.

In the aftermath of her death, Lyles’ family and friends, and the community at large, have cried out for answers: Did the officers act appropriately? Why could they not de-escalate the situation?

Lyles sister Monika Williams asked, “Why couldn’t they have Tased her?”

In the audio recording of the incident, Officer McNew can be heard telling Officer Anderson to do just that. Anderson answers, “I don’t have a Taser.”

The transcripts released by the department show two officers panicked by Lyles, who Anderson says was lunging at his abdomen with a knife. He explains that it unfolded so quickly that he does not believe he could have de-escalated the situation.

In the transcripts, the SPD interviewers do not press Anderson on the policy that requires him to carry his Taser.

Seattle Police Chief Police Chief Kathleen O’Toole responded to a request for comment with a text: “It’s all part of the ongoing investigation and will be considered by [the Force Review Board] and [the Office of Professional Accountability]. We’re trying to get everything out there ASAP in the spirit of transparency.”

O’Toole has confirmed that neither officer had a Taser at the scene of Lyles’ shooting. The chief told Crosscut earlier this week that officers have a choice between several non-lethal options: Taser, baton or pepper spray.

In the transcripts released by the department, McNew told interviewers, “I believed Anderson, and I don’t know if this is true or not, I believe in the past that he has carried a Taser.”

The Lyles shooting has spurred protests, community meetings and public hearings. It prompted the Seattle Jewish Federation to withdraw a social justice award it had planned to give the Seattle Police Department. Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant has called for an independent investigation.

That it came on the heels of the acquittal of Officer Jeronimo Yanez, the Minnesota officer who shot Philando Castille in his car, has made the incident even worse.

As the department looks to finally emerge from beneath the cloud of a federal lawsuit demanding reforms, the Lyles incident has dramatically shifted the entire conversation.

[syndicated profile] scalziwhatever_feed

Posted by John Scalzi

Gotta be honest, I had entirely forgotten I’d done this interview last year when I was in Iowa City for a book festival. But eventually it all came back to me. Also, it’s a pretty good interview. Enjoy.


still present

Jun. 23rd, 2017 07:28 pm
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[personal profile] alatefeline
Still present. Staying with things. Uncle slept all day, is declining, no longer able to drink liquids. Aunt got out of the house for a few hours while we (Dad and I) were there. Cousin age 5 is a handful and a delight. We fought many monsters, took the dog for a walk, and ate gorilla food (gorilla munch brand corn pop cereal, yogurt, sliced fruit). At lodge to rest now. I am sad and not okay, but I am okay with not being okay, and I am here.

梅雨 Diary - Arrival (21-22 June)

Jun. 24th, 2017 08:48 am
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[personal profile] steepholm
On the 21st the sun rose early (as one would expect on the solstice), but not as early as me, nor many other Bristolians, who were making pre-dawn departures in various directions. Some, I've no doubt, were heading east to Stonehenge, but a large contingent was going south to Glastonbury, and I encountered a good wodge of them in Bristol bus station, where special coaches were being laid on at regular intervals.

IMG0403AIMG0404A

As for me, I was off to Heathrow, though I did get to see the solstice sun rise in Wiltshire, admittedly over the M4 rather than the heel stone:

IMG0405A

The journey all went very smoothly. After some hairy experiences at Schiphol two years ago I'd been worried by the fact that I only had an hour to make my connection at Frankfurt, especially as it involved two different airlines (Lufthansa and All Nippon Airways), but the combination of German efficiency and, er, Japanese efficiency, meant that I needn't have worried.

On the plane from Frankfurt to Tokyo I found myself sitting between two middle-aged Japanese women, both of whom spent much of the next 11 hours in face masks, but who were to play a significant role in my journey.

I'd secretly been a little annoyed by the woman sitting to my right, because she closed the window just before take-off, depriving me of a view I always enjoy. Also, I remembered that you're meant to leave the windows open on take-off and landing, for the grisly reason that it helps recovery workers count the bodies in the event of a crash. I composed a Japanese sentence to this effect in my head, but hesitated to speak it, considering that it would be kind of snotty, however perfect the grammar, and that we were after all destined to be companions for quite a while.

She rose considerably in my estimation when I woke from a nap to find her absent from her seat. How had she escaped without waking me or my equally slumberous companion to the left? A minute later I had my answer, when she returned, removed her shoes, and clambered over both arm rests with the considerate dexterity of a service-industry ninja.

Then, about half hour from arrival, she became a friend for life by positively shaking me to point out a beautiful view of Mount Fuji.

Apart from one very distant blurry glimpse from a Tokyo high-rise last year, it was my first Fuji sighting, and it looked marvellous in the clear early-morning sun (for it was now 6am the next day, thanks to the magic of time zones), brown with an icing-sugar sprinkle of snow. Of course, I tried to take a picture with my crappy mobile phone, but captured nothing but a blur. Then I remembered that I'd bought a camera especially for the trip, and dug that out. Unfortunately I hadn't yet taught myself to use it, and my attempts were really no better than before. Eventually my kind companion suggested I photograph the picture she'd just taken with her iPhone. So here it is, my photograph of the next-door passenger's iPhone's photograph of Mount Fuji:

DSC00024

Just like being there, isn't it? Hokusai would be proud.

As for my left-hand companion, she chatted politely with me, asking why I was coming to Japan, and so on, which was a good chance to give my Japanese a light workout. When I explained about the lectures I'd be giving in Tokyo she promised to tell her daughter, who was interested in anime - but added that her cousin (who was travelling on the same plane) happened to live in Kichijouji, near the university where I'd be staying, and would be happy to show me there when we landed.

So it was that I spent my first hour in Tokyo with left-hand companion and her cousin, the latter seeing me through the Tokyo tube in the rush-hour crush (no joke when you have two sizeable cases), all the way to the door of the university. She'd made a couple of remarks about looking forward to getting back to her Japanese life after her stay in Germany (her younger sister had married a German and even taken citizenship), so I thanked her for her "authentic Japanese hospitality" (本物の日本のおもてなし) - which I think pleased her, but was sincerely meant.

I spent the rest of that day meeting people, paying rent, registering at the library and getting online, and so on - more or less in a daze, for it was 24 hours since I'd had any sleep worth the name. I'll leave that aside for the moment - we will meet these actors again - and just give you a quick tour of my dwelling, the Foreign Faculty House, where I am sole resident. The outside I've already posted, but here it is again, in glorious colour:

DSC00044

So far, the rainy season has consisted of bright sunshine and 29-degree heat, and my little patch of garden is alive with butterflies and dragonflies. A murder of crows has taken up lugubrious residence in a nearby grove.

Inside, I have a spacious and comfortable apartment, though rather oddly appointed. The building, being almost 100 years old, is in any case ancient by Japanese standards, with polished wooden floors on the landings to facilitate the swish of kimonos (not that kimonos do swish, but this is the obligatory word to use with female clothing of yore) and, I suppose, the clatter of geta. There is an ominous stairwell that leads up into a void, but from which, so far, nothing has issued. Anyway, here are a few shots of the inside, to give you a feel:

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Some of the facilities, though not quite coaeval with the house, have a distinctly retro vibe - but this makes me feel quite at home, my heart spending much of its time in the 1970s in any case.

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Japanese error in most urgent need of correction? Why, that would be my habit of pronouncing "Toukyou Joshi Dai" (the abbreviation everyone round here uses for the name of this university) as "Toukyou Dai Joshi", which translates rather unfortunately as "Tokyo Big Girls".

This must end.

Unfuck tomorrow morning

Jun. 23rd, 2017 09:00 pm
[syndicated profile] unfuckurhabitat_feed
  • Wash the dishes in your sink
  • Get your outfit for tomorrow together, including accessories
  • Set up coffee/tea/breakfast
  • Make your lunch
  • Put your keys somewhere obvious
  • Wash your face and brush your teeth
  • Take your medication/set out your meds for the morning
  • Charge your electronics
  • Pour a little cleaner in the toilet bowl (if you don’t have pets or children or sleepwalking adults)
  • Set your alarm
  • Go to bed at a reasonable hour

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Joshua Kronengold

May 2017

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